BROOKLINE TOWN MEETINGS REFERENCING SLAVERY, 17th and 18th Century:

Lancelott and Joseph Smith notify the Town Meeting that they have "bought from the collony seven Indians to be sold as slaves" [that they will hold temporarily in Town until they can arrange to sell them to the Caribbean].

Muddy River & Brookline Records, 1634-1838 (the record of Town Meetings), September 22, 1675.

1765: "Henry Sewall. . . submitted a bill to the town for the services of his slave Felix as janitor of the First Church."

History of the Town of Brookline, John Gould Curtis, p. 255.

"At a meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Brooklyn to consider what was propper for this town to do, relative to the large Quantitys of Tea belonging to the India Company, hourly expected to arrive in this Province. The Town came unanimously into the following Resolves Viz. That the Act of the British Parliament imposing Duty on Tea, payable in America, for the Express purpose of raising Revenue, is unconstitutional, has a direct Tendency to bring the Americans into Slavery, and is therefore an Intolerable Grievance."

Muddy River & Brookline Records, 1634-1838 (the record of Town Meetings), November 26-29, 1773. [Spellings & capitalizations as in original.]

Colonel Joseph Belcher, his family and 3 slaves (Bung, Warwick and Pompey), are ordered out of town within 14 days to save Brookline from "from all charges that may arise by means of their residence."

Muddy River & Brookline Records, 1634-1838 (the record of Town Meetings), February 18, 1778. [Spellings in the original.]